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Chess World Online Chess Forum - Chess and dementia

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  Play ... Latest Forum Posts > Chess Forums > Chess - General discussion
  Chess and dementia




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Reyn

Chess rating: 1266



 Topics started


Canada
Give chess goodie
Mon Apr 2 2018 2:29AM | MsgID: 19783294


Originally posted by: "488"
Sorry if I missed it, but was the consensus that OTB play was thought to be more efficacious than CW ?



Hi Paul, no, I don't think so. I would think that either form of chess would be helpful.

As I quoted below, I think the idea is to focus on the process, not the outcome.

I hear pickleball is good, too.







488

Chess rating: 1367



 Topics started


United States
Give chess goodie
Mon Apr 2 2018 1:38AM | MsgID: 19783292


Sorry if I missed it, but was the consensus that OTB play was thought to be more efficacious than CW ?







Reyn

Chess rating: 1266



 Topics started


Canada
Give chess goodie
Sat Mar 31 2018 4:44PM | MsgID: 19783236


You both make good points. Time elapsed would effect your efforts.

But, in that case, this form of chess does lend itself more to finding (the process) the best move, wouldn't it?

Since to complete a game takes considerably longer, it should be (in theory) be simpler to look at the here and now, rather than the outcome.







Apollo

Chess rating: 1222





 Topics started


United Kingdom
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Sat Mar 31 2018 12:49PM | MsgID: 19783230


Is the issue one of trying to prevent, or reduce, short-term memory loss, which is often a precursor to dementia?

Is it possible that playing move by move as implied in CC/CW chess is better that the more compressed approach in OTB where the whole time-scale is compressed into a couple of hours, whereas, in games here on CW the time scale is in weeks or months?







TheWelshKnight

Chess rating: 1551





 Topics started


Poland
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Sat Mar 31 2018 6:36AM | edited: 6:48:13 | MsgID: 19783221


Can say that in playing of correspondence style chess general consensus is to play in a mode of "my best move" rather than to concentrate on the game as a whole. For me that's one of the main differences between OTB and correspondence.

Mainly due to the time frame involved, by the time each move in each game arrives my memory does not allow for remembering why the previous move was played in correspondence. Similar to solving a fresh puzzle with each response.

Seems fairly obvious to say, but with OTB only a few minutes may elapse with the responses, however several days may have gone by with correspondence by the time the next move is made.







Reyn

Chess rating: 1266



 Topics started


Canada
Give chess goodie
Sat Mar 31 2018 5:14AM | edited: 5:20:35 | MsgID: 19783220


Here is an interesting tidbit from the below site:

10 Stimulating Activities for Alzheimer’s Patients

[...] "Remember to concentrate on the process of an activity and not the results. It does not matter if you never get the puzzle put together. What matters is that your loved one enjoyed the time spent on it and felt useful." [...]

So, if we extrapolate that to playing games of chess, I gather from the above quote that would entail concentrating on individual moves, and certainly not the outcome of a game, be it a win or a loss.

Do you see it that way?








Apollo

Chess rating: 1222





 Topics started


United Kingdom
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Thu Mar 29 2018 4:11PM | MsgID: 19783188


And other activities such as reading, both books and newspapers.

Last, but not least, intellectually stimulating discussions to support or refute an assertion, a proposition or, in extremis a principle!







Reyn

Chess rating: 1266



 Topics started


Canada
Give chess goodie
Thu Mar 29 2018 3:13PM | edited: 3:14:35 | MsgID: 19783185


Hmm, okay, thanks for that. All new to me.

The problem is that statins come with their own set of problems / side effects.

I'll stick to chess / crosswords.







Apollo

Chess rating: 1222





 Topics started


United Kingdom
Give chess goodie
Thu Mar 29 2018 2:59PM | edited: 3:12:22 | MsgID: 19783182


Check this out

Statins and dementia -1


and this

Statins and dementia - 2


and this

Statins and dementia - 3



However, despite the good claimed for statins, there are, or can be, a number of quite unpleasant side-effects. I found excessive tiredness, muscular fatigue and some suspected memory dysfunction over the years that I took them. Then, oh blessed relief, my cardiologist decided that in my case they were no longer justified so I am now statin free.


I'm still inclined to your original hypothesis: keep the mind active in any way that you can. If that works, then fine. If not, then you will have at least enjoyed yourself in the declining years.










Reyn

Chess rating: 1266



 Topics started


Canada
Give chess goodie
Wed Mar 28 2018 9:41PM | MsgID: 19783149


Originally posted by: "Apollo"
... There has also been a widely propogated view that statins are the next miracle drug to control the disease.



I had not heard about the use of statins in regards to dementia.


-------

The bike project is quite intriguing. I can see from the video that it really engages the user.

--------

In the meantime, here is another link about the use of chess and dementia.

Reading, Chess May Help Fight Alzheimer's










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