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  Play ... Latest Forum Posts > Chess Forums > Chess - General discussion
  Chess opening books for beginners.




bwzins64

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Mon Feb 13 2017 12:00AM | MsgID: 19557924


I'm sure he's better than he used to be. He probably had to be if he wanted to sell anymore books. Even Silman has said he's better. A few years ago Schiller wrote 'First Chess Openings', which has a lot high ratings on Amazon, but I'm not even interested in looking at it.

Soltis is one of my favorite authors, but even he wrote a few very thin opening books in the late '80s early '90s. Maybe it something to do with the time period. I do still have a few, but there were others I bought that didn't look like he put much effort into it. I had a book about Pillsbury that was riddled with errors.

Thanks again for the help!

Brian







R_De_Siota

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Sun Feb 12 2017 3:32PM | MsgID: 19556803


I've only seen the one Schiller book, so I have no opinion on his authorship ability. At least Standard Chess Openings presents things in an orderly fashion, and the games are good examples of each opening's main variations. Newcomers and beginners may find the catalyst to try some of the things in it. Intermediate and beyond, not so much.

Most of the "New Ideas In The Pteradactyl" type books are little more than computer dumps. Some authors do better organizing than others. I always read such things with a grain of salt (and a shot of tequila).







bwzins64

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Fri Feb 10 2017 11:04PM | MsgID: 19553665


Originally posted by: "dsoc"
I learnt how to play using "Begin Chess" by David Pritchard. The copy I had used English notation but I believe it has been republished using Algebraic.




Thanks! I'll look into it. ๐Ÿ˜Š







bwzins64

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Fri Feb 10 2017 10:57PM | edited: 11:34:34 | MsgID: 19553649


Thanks for the continued help, but I HATE Eric Schiller! He burned me a couple times in the late '80s, early '90s. One book was called 'The Rat'. It was supposed to be about the 'Modern' opening, but in hindsight it could have an autobiography. ๐Ÿ˜Š All it was was a database dump. Just a list of games with little if any annotations. This was before databases were common, but come on! Jeremy Silman once said that Schiller told him he once (maybe more) wrote a book in a day! It was probably 'The Rat'. If you go to the 'Chess books' forum, there's a thread titled 'Poorest/least satisfactory book purchase' and Schiller's name comes up several times! I'm never buying or reading another Schiller book again. If you gave it to me free, I wouldn't want it. :-icky

Edit: My mistake, it was actually called 'New Ideas In the Rat'. It's for sale on Amazon if anybody's interested.







R_De_Siota

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Fri Feb 10 2017 3:45PM | MsgID: 19552796


"Standard Chess Openings" by Eric Schiller is a good survey of all the main openings. He also wrote "Unorthodox Chess Openings" to cover those rare lines seldom seen.







dsoc

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Thu Feb 9 2017 8:56PM | MsgID: 19551466


I learnt how to play using "Begin Chess" by David Pritchard. The copy I had used English notation but I believe it has been republished using Algebraic.







R_De_Siota

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Sat Jan 28 2017 6:52PM | MsgID: 19527063


It was published by Batsford in 1987 under the title, "Openings For The Club Player," before being republished in 1988 by Dover under the current title. As far as I know, it's still available from Dover.

Another excellent book is: "The Ideas Behind The Chess Openings" by Reuben Fine. The original (1943) was in descriptive notation, but the 1989 version is in algebraic.







bwzins64

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Sat Jan 28 2017 3:11AM | MsgID: 19525749


Thanks! I forgot about that one. Currently I'm doing research on several books. I'll add it to the list. ๐Ÿ˜Š







R_De_Siota

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Fri Jan 27 2017 5:30PM | MsgID: 19524921


"Chess Openings For The Average Player" by Tim Harding and Leonard Barden is a good place to start.







bwzins64

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Thu Jan 26 2017 10:03PM | MsgID: 19523333


In a response to a product review that I posted on Amazon, someone asked me what are the best opening books for beginners? Specifically, "...those that might be simple for kids (or adults lacking expertise and/or time)?" Thanks for any help!