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  Play ... Latest Forum Posts > Chess Forums > Chess - General discussion
  Chess Tips




kasmersensei

Chess rating: 2348



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Japan
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Sun Jun 12 2016 4:09PM | MsgID: 19083716


Originally posted by: "mjgayle52"
The pieces should move together like a well oiled machine. To achieve this consider your next 3 (ideal) moves instead of just 1 good move by one piece. Don't forget your opponent has plans too, so take those plans into consideration. Of course you can look deeper than 3 moves.




Sometimes my machine breaks down, other times it's oil runs hot but manages to eke out a victory. I often try to consider longer term plans even when I win material; sometimes opponents gain time or a minor attack in the sphere they are interested in (usually a kingside attack).







kasmersensei

Chess rating: 2348



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Japan
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Sun Jun 12 2016 4:07PM | MsgID: 19083713


Good point, sometimes why we lost is more obvious; a misplacement of a piece (only becoming more obvious in later variations), an obvious blunder. But sometimes it's a lot more subtle.







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2220
LCF 1668




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United States
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Sun Jun 12 2016 1:39PM | MsgID: 19083461


The pieces should move together like a well oiled machine. To achieve this consider your next 3 (ideal) moves instead of just 1 good move by one piece. Don't forget your opponent has plans too, so take those plans into consideration. Of course you can look deeper than 3 moves.







roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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United States
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Fri Jun 10 2016 7:20PM | MsgID: 19080434


Mistakes, either yours or your opponent's, aren't always obvious. A move may not be bad; sometimes it's just indifferent. Look closely at such moves when you find them.







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2220
LCF 1668




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United States
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Fri Jun 10 2016 1:55PM | MsgID: 19079888


It is possible that we really do learn more from our mistakes. Analyze the games you lost. Find the biggest mistake and concentrate on how to avoid something similar in the future. Difficult to review lost games because of the negative emotions? - no problem - wait a month and then review the game when the emotions have cooled.







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2220
LCF 1668




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United States
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Sun Jun 5 2016 1:07PM | MsgID: 19070528


Are you good at multiple choice tests?

(1) observe/analyze the position
(2) generate a short list of good moves (3-5) that fit your observations
(3) look at each choice and choose the best one
*when possible do two or more things - let's say you are moving an attacked piece - can you move it to a safe square that also attacks the opponent or reinforces/furthers a plan of your own...etc







roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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United States
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Fri Jun 3 2016 7:03PM | MsgID: 19067431


Originally posted by: "mjgayle52"
I believe, with perfect play, chess is a draw. Therefore one view of winning chess games involves helping your opponent make errors. Whether this involves deliberately raising the complexity of the game, studying tactics, setting traps, analyzing your opponents plan guessing there next move and making that move (subtly) an error...thoughts?




I support the idea of making provocative moves to guide one's opponent toward a position more favorable to one's self. Diverting an opponent's piece from the center to the queen-side by way of a weak pawn, for example, can be a good thing. The Boleslavsky Sicilian is built around the idea of a backward pawn on d6. Bronstein wrote about such moves in some of his annotations and commentaries.







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2220
LCF 1668




 Topics started


United States
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Fri Jun 3 2016 2:51PM | MsgID: 19066969


I believe, with perfect play, chess is a draw. Therefore one view of winning chess games involves helping your opponent make errors. Whether this involves deliberately raising the complexity of the game, studying tactics, setting traps, analyzing your opponents plan guessing there next move and making that move (subtly) an error...thoughts?







Taotaomonas

Chess rating: 1695





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Australia
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Wed Jun 1 2016 8:38PM | MsgID: 19063818


Originally posted by: "roughknight6"
I thought you'd seen "Zulu Dawn" one time too many... 😜




No just the once...
Zulu Dawn, nice girl...







roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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United States
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Wed Jun 1 2016 4:17PM | MsgID: 19063263


I thought you'd seen "Zulu Dawn" one time too many... 😜







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