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  Play ... Latest Forum Posts > Chess Forums > Chess - General discussion
  Chess Tips




roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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Sun May 29 2016 8:45PM | MsgID: 19057933


Originally posted by: "LarryN"
A knight on the rim can be quite dim.




A knight in the corner will make you a mourner.

(For the mathematically inclined, a knight on the rim only has four possible moves, and one in the corner but two. They're better in the center, where they have eight.)







LarryN

Chess rating: 1776





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Sun May 29 2016 6:20PM | MsgID: 19057663


A knight on the rim can be quite dim.







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2125
LCF 1668




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Sun May 15 2016 11:47PM | MsgID: 19031258


roughknight6 - thank you - i enjoy reading other peoples ideas much more than expressing my own - changes in perspective are both disorienting and enlightening







roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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Sun May 15 2016 10:11PM | MsgID: 19031089


Originally posted by: "mjgayle52"
In chess we are often involved in one of two kinds of "searches" for the best move. The first type we share with computer programs and can be called "look ahead" or "forward search". This is the "if i do this - then he does that..." kind of search. It can be combined with static evaluation and min-max. People use another kind of search that is more difficult to code and might be called "goal oriented" but i think of it as "look back". A person might look at a position and notice an opponents loose pawn for instance and try to think of ways to capture it over the next few moves. Observation combined with high level strategies are the bread and butter of human chess. Look ahead is certainly used but ideal for tactics and blunder checking.




You, sir, have just given the most lucid explanation of the difference between a tactically inclined player and a positionally inclined one I've read. Kudos!







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2125
LCF 1668




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Sun May 15 2016 6:30PM | MsgID: 19030680


In chess we are often involved in one of two kinds of "searches" for the best move. The first type we share with computer programs and can be called "look ahead" or "forward search". This is the "if i do this - then he does that..." kind of search. It can be combined with static evaluation and min-max. People use another kind of search that is more difficult to code and might be called "goal oriented" but i think of it as "look back". A person might look at a position and notice an opponents loose pawn for instance and try to think of ways to capture it over the next few moves. Observation combined with high level strategies are the bread and butter of human chess. Look ahead is certainly used but ideal for tactics and blunder checking.







roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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Sun May 15 2016 5:02PM | MsgID: 19030517


A friend once asked me: "What is your philosophy of chess?" Trying to figure out why I moved or didn't move this or that has brought me no closer to the answer, but it has improved my chess. Sometimes questioning a dogmatically routine placement of a piece, Nf3, for example, can be a very good thing.







ockendon

Chess rating: 1777
LCF 109 Fide approx. 1795






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Sat May 14 2016 9:49PM | edited: 9:52:29 | MsgID: 19029179


Originally posted by: "mjgayle52"
Under the category of "best idea i ever reinvented" is the following. Look at all of your pieces. Which one is in the least ideal position? Improve the position of that piece or develop a plan to do so. "The principle of the worst piece" can be attributed to a number of players but it looks like much credit goes to the brilliant German 19th century master Adolf Anderssen.



That's very good advice!

A piece that frequently gets in my way is the knight on f3 (if I'm white), when I want to send a pawn attack against my opponent's kingside castled position. What on earth do you do with it, other than tucking it away on h2, where it serves no very useful purpose, and blocks the rook on h1 that's meant to be a key part of that attack?







roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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Sat May 14 2016 6:28PM | MsgID: 19028851


GM Emanuel Lasker assigned the "Get out the pieces!" quote to Anderssen, so, I can see it.

As an aside, "desperado" doesn't always mean "desparate." Some blunders have no recovering, some do. At a cursory glance, an exchange sacrifice can appear to be a blunder. Would a rook making mischief before leaving the board after taking out a bishop be a 'desperado' or an exchange sacrifice?







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2125
LCF 1668




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Fri May 13 2016 7:31PM | edited: 7:32:23 | MsgID: 19027021


Under the category of "best idea i ever reinvented" is the following. Look at all of your pieces. Which one is in the least ideal position? Improve the position of that piece or develop a plan to do so. "The principle of the worst piece" can be attributed to a number of players but it looks like much credit goes to the brilliant German 19th century master Adolf Anderssen.







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2125
LCF 1668




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Mon May 2 2016 8:53PM | MsgID: 19005187


Originally posted by: "roughknight6"
Has anyone found a good resource for tactics training when it comes to either finding or countering the so-called 'desperado' moves?


I don't know of any Tactics books or resources that are aimed specifically at desperado moves. The "Tactics Time" by Tim Brennan are very good. I think of Desperado moves as causing as much mischief as possible before giving up material. It is funny how creative we can get when we think we are about to lose something.







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