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  Play ... Latest Forum Posts > Chess Forums > Chess - General discussion
  Chess Tips




roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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Mon May 2 2016 5:36PM | MsgID: 19004776


Has anyone found a good resource for tactics training when it comes to either finding or countering the so-called 'desperado' moves?







kasmersensei

Chess rating: 2348



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Mon May 2 2016 12:10AM | MsgID: 19003574


Tactics practice is a good idea as it makes combinations jump out at you after a while. Having a checklist is always a good idea. One problem I have recently is misanalyzing, which I still do often enough to make it annoying. I find this happens more when I manage to get an inferior position where I have to defend a lot; sometimes I just crack. That and real life stressers sometimes to conspire to break my concentration??







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2140
LCF 1668




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Sun May 1 2016 10:02PM | MsgID: 19003412


For a while i was doing tactics problems every day to tune up for a tournament (paid off handsomely btw). To speed the process of finding combinations i found a directed set of observational questions was very useful. (1) what pieces are loose (both sides) (2) what are the captures (3) what are the checks (4) what pieces are lined up making them possibly available for pins and skewers....these habits began to appear naturally in my games and brought my rating on this site to it's highest, roughly coinciding with the otb tourney.







kasmersensei

Chess rating: 2348



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Sun May 1 2016 3:16PM | MsgID: 19002565


Yes, note taking can be very helpful, though I am not good at remembering to always review them before moving. :) Generally speaking though, the notes help me for reviewing lines I already found for candidate moves and possible snags/traps in those lines.







kasmersensei

Chess rating: 2348



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Sun May 1 2016 3:14PM | MsgID: 19002559


I find it helpful, flipping the board. Sometimes we need to remember our opponent's threats and take note of them as they can often be disrupting to our own plans.







ketchuplover

Chess rating: 1622



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Fri Apr 29 2016 12:37AM | MsgID: 18997715


Observe. Calculate. Move. Cross fingers.







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2140
LCF 1668




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Thu Apr 28 2016 4:23PM | MsgID: 18996798


it is worth mentioning that in correspondence chess that not only can you "move the pieces" as in using the analysis board provided but another advantage that some may not be employing is that you can make notes. you can't make notes in otb and it can be a huge advantage in this form of the game. so - write things down. there is a notes capability provided btw.







bwzins64

Chess rating: 2181





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Thu Apr 28 2016 5:17AM | MsgID: 18995942


Originally posted by: "mjgayle52"
I am saying there are competing concerns and a good player breaks out of simple rules and begins to think in terms of competing values and the dynamics of the position. And to start thinking for yourself.




That I agree with 100%.







roughknight6

Chess rating: 1601

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Wed Apr 27 2016 7:21PM | MsgID: 18995142


Know what you play and play what you know. Your repertoire is more than copying a few good openings from a book. Understand the middle game strategies arising from the openings, and to which endgame positions they can lead. Use real games from your favored openings as much as possible for tactics training and endgame studies. You're far more likely to see that otb than anything else. Make your opponent play your game, don't volunteer to play his.







mjgayle52

Chess rating: 2140
LCF 1668




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Wed Apr 27 2016 2:40PM | MsgID: 18994632


another tip - you have heard it before - and if you are like me - you don't like it - on the analysis board use the "flip" button and see what your opponent is up to from their side - the otb equivalent is to get up and walk around behind your opponent and check things out from his side - i know flipping the board can be oddly disorienting but try it anyway - put it in your toolkit







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